Bank of 'nan and granddad' replcaes Bank of Mum and Dad

Bank of 'nan and granddad' replcaes Bank of Mum and Dad

Bank of 'nan and granddad' replcaes Bank of Mum and Dad

First published in Somerset
Last updated

THE bank of mum and dad is fast becoming the bank of 'nan and granddad' after a poll revealed that Britain's over 50s plan to give their grandchildren £16.7 billion for university costs.

Saga Savings' poll suggests that more than a third of Britain's estimated 11.8 million grandparents have funded, or are planning to help fund, their grandchildren's studies. The survey of almost 10,000 over 50s shows that, on average, they will each fork out nearly £4,000.

In addition, 67% of over-50s parents contribute an average of £6,777 to the cost of sending their children to university.

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10:17am Wed 20 Aug 14

SocialistParty-SomersetBranch says...

Unite to fight pay robbery!

*Lobby the TUC on 7 September
*Coordinate strikes on 14 October
*Join the TUC London demo on 18 October

Workers in Britain have been hit by the biggest fall in pay since 1880. Increasingly, work simply does not pay! But as incomes drop, the anger is rising.

Average wages after inflation are down by more than £1,600 since 2010 - the biggest drop in any Parliament since Tory Benjamin Disraeli was prime minister.

Average real weekly earnings are 8% lower since the Con-Dems came to power and 15% lower for under-25s. No wonder an estimated half a million people a year will be receiving food parcels by 2016.

The Con-Dem government and its big business masters are taking us back to the 19th century with poverty pay and the destruction of public services.

Workers have got no option but to fight to break the attack on our living standards.

The public sector pay dispute will now continue into the autumn. Local government workers in the Unison, Unite and GMB unions will take strike action on 14 October.

The Socialist Party calls on all the public sector unions to immediately meet together to ensure that all of the one million-plus workers that struck on 10 July (J10) are involved.

This includes teachers and civil servants. But, with NHS workers also balloting, a strike of 30 November 2011 (N30) proportions is now possible.

Britain needs a pay rise

With the TUC's 'Britain needs a pay rise' demo called on 18 October, we could see a mobilisation on the scale of the mammoth 26 March 2011 demonstration that saw 750,000 workers march through London.

That march, coming a few months after Osborne's first austerity budget, seems an age ago.

The National Shop Stewards Network produced 40,000 flyers that day warning that we needed the 'fight of our lives' - that if the cuts went through it would be a catastrophe for working class people and the vast majority in society. Isn't that the reality for many today?

But this was not inevitable. The demonstration in March 2011 signalled the build-up to the pensions strike on N30.

Two million workers participated in the biggest single day of action since the 1926 General Strike.

It was a massive day with virtually every town and city seeing workers' rallies and marches. But instead of being the platform for further action, the TUC and conservative union leaders accepted the government's pensions deal.

The result was not just that the pensions strike was demobilised but the door was opened up to the full force of the cuts.

Undoubtedly, many activists have feared that history was repeating itself as the weeks passed since J10. Earlier dates in September were first floated, but 14 October is an opportunity to build generalised action that must be taken with both hands.

Low pay - no way

All public sector unions should be involved in the 14 October strike action. A real momentum can be built to get the maximum turnout.

Even during their well-earned summer holidays, many teachers in the NUT will be trying to put pressure on their union to ensure that they line up with school staff. There should be no need to wait around until October to confirm their participation.



The Socialist Party also calls on private sector unions to discuss how their members can coordinate action. Over the last year, we have seen a rash of disputes from workers at London Underground to Doncaster Care UK, Tyneside Safety Glass and Argos.

As we go to press, Ritzy Cinema workers in Lambeth are voting on whether to accept a deal that would in a year take them to the London Living Wage after an impressive struggle.

Thousands of private sector workers could be involved if there is a general call for any live disputes to be coordinated with the 14 October strike.

It is almost unprecedented that the unions are taking action on this scale so close to a general election.

When the POA prison officers' union successfully moved their general strike motion at the TUC Congress in 2012, the right-wing union leaders who opposed it argued instead that the unions 'should wait for a Labour government'. No doubt some leaders of those unions who took action on J10 are tempted by this argument.

On one hand, they lack the confidence that they can defeat the government, while on the other they don't want to expose Ed Miliband and the Labour leadership just eight months before the general election.

But working class people already see Labour in action in councils where it has simply wielded the Tory axe. And Miliband accepts austerity and the pay freeze that flows from it. The election will be a choice between pro-cuts parties.

Statement of intent

A victory in the pay dispute would not just be a major blow against Cameron. But it would also be a statement of intent against Miliband or whoever forms the next government - they will face a workers' movement that is prepared and able to resist cuts.

Scandalously, a majority of the union leaders at Labour's Policy Forum accepted Labour's spending plans which follow Tory austerity limits in return for minor concessions. This is a disastrous approach that will only demoralise activists.

The calling of the 14 October strike is a reflection of the real world - the real economic pain being suffered by workers and their families who cannot wait for the faint hope that Labour, if they win next May will lift the siege on their living standards. It is this mass pressure that is forcing the pay strikes to continue.

The strike planned for 14 October will be a significant step in the battle against austerity. In demonstrating in action their enormous potential power, the unions could draw behind them millions of, as yet, unorganised workers and all those suffering from these brutal cuts.

The idea of a 24-hour general strike has been pushed back by the cowardly actions of the right-wing trade union leaders. But the need for it is widely understood, even if the confidence is not there at this time.

The 14 October action has the potential to change this, bringing general strike action back to the forefront of workers' minds. This will open up the prospect of defeating this government and any government that acts in the interests of the 1%.

Therefore, union members have to keep the pressure on. If your union hasn't confirmed for 14 October, move a motion at your next branch. Come to the lobby of the TUC Congress that the NSSN has called on 7 September. That will be a more than useful forum to discuss how to keep the action going and broaden and deepen the dispute.

And inevitably, this campaign and the strikes themselves will pose the question of a political alternative. Just as they did on J10 and in 2011, workers striking in October will come up against the opposition of Labour politicians.

They fear a mobilised trade union movement as much as the Con-Dems. The building of a mass political voice for working class people would hugely increase that fear.

NSSN rally and lobby of the TUC Congress in Liverpool: 'Keep striking together for a pay rise'

Speakers include Mark Serwotka, PCS general secretary

2pm, Sunday 7 September

Jurys Hotel, opposite Echo Arena Conference Centre in Albert Dock

See www.shopstewards.net for more - email info@shopstewards.ne
t

www.socialistparty.o
rg.uk
Unite to fight pay robbery! *Lobby the TUC on 7 September *Coordinate strikes on 14 October *Join the TUC London demo on 18 October Workers in Britain have been hit by the biggest fall in pay since 1880. Increasingly, work simply does not pay! But as incomes drop, the anger is rising. Average wages after inflation are down by more than £1,600 since 2010 - the biggest drop in any Parliament since Tory Benjamin Disraeli was prime minister. Average real weekly earnings are 8% lower since the Con-Dems came to power and 15% lower for under-25s. No wonder an estimated half a million people a year will be receiving food parcels by 2016. The Con-Dem government and its big business masters are taking us back to the 19th century with poverty pay and the destruction of public services. Workers have got no option but to fight to break the attack on our living standards. The public sector pay dispute will now continue into the autumn. Local government workers in the Unison, Unite and GMB unions will take strike action on 14 October. The Socialist Party calls on all the public sector unions to immediately meet together to ensure that all of the one million-plus workers that struck on 10 July (J10) are involved. This includes teachers and civil servants. But, with NHS workers also balloting, a strike of 30 November 2011 (N30) proportions is now possible. Britain needs a pay rise With the TUC's 'Britain needs a pay rise' demo called on 18 October, we could see a mobilisation on the scale of the mammoth 26 March 2011 demonstration that saw 750,000 workers march through London. That march, coming a few months after Osborne's first austerity budget, seems an age ago. The National Shop Stewards Network produced 40,000 flyers that day warning that we needed the 'fight of our lives' - that if the cuts went through it would be a catastrophe for working class people and the vast majority in society. Isn't that the reality for many today? But this was not inevitable. The demonstration in March 2011 signalled the build-up to the pensions strike on N30. Two million workers participated in the biggest single day of action since the 1926 General Strike. It was a massive day with virtually every town and city seeing workers' rallies and marches. But instead of being the platform for further action, the TUC and conservative union leaders accepted the government's pensions deal. The result was not just that the pensions strike was demobilised but the door was opened up to the full force of the cuts. Undoubtedly, many activists have feared that history was repeating itself as the weeks passed since J10. Earlier dates in September were first floated, but 14 October is an opportunity to build generalised action that must be taken with both hands. Low pay - no way All public sector unions should be involved in the 14 October strike action. A real momentum can be built to get the maximum turnout. Even during their well-earned summer holidays, many teachers in the NUT will be trying to put pressure on their union to ensure that they line up with school staff. There should be no need to wait around until October to confirm their participation. The Socialist Party also calls on private sector unions to discuss how their members can coordinate action. Over the last year, we have seen a rash of disputes from workers at London Underground to Doncaster Care UK, Tyneside Safety Glass and Argos. As we go to press, Ritzy Cinema workers in Lambeth are voting on whether to accept a deal that would in a year take them to the London Living Wage after an impressive struggle. Thousands of private sector workers could be involved if there is a general call for any live disputes to be coordinated with the 14 October strike. It is almost unprecedented that the unions are taking action on this scale so close to a general election. When the POA prison officers' union successfully moved their general strike motion at the TUC Congress in 2012, the right-wing union leaders who opposed it argued instead that the unions 'should wait for a Labour government'. No doubt some leaders of those unions who took action on J10 are tempted by this argument. On one hand, they lack the confidence that they can defeat the government, while on the other they don't want to expose Ed Miliband and the Labour leadership just eight months before the general election. But working class people already see Labour in action in councils where it has simply wielded the Tory axe. And Miliband accepts austerity and the pay freeze that flows from it. The election will be a choice between pro-cuts parties. Statement of intent A victory in the pay dispute would not just be a major blow against Cameron. But it would also be a statement of intent against Miliband or whoever forms the next government - they will face a workers' movement that is prepared and able to resist cuts. Scandalously, a majority of the union leaders at Labour's Policy Forum accepted Labour's spending plans which follow Tory austerity limits in return for minor concessions. This is a disastrous approach that will only demoralise activists. The calling of the 14 October strike is a reflection of the real world - the real economic pain being suffered by workers and their families who cannot wait for the faint hope that Labour, if they win next May will lift the siege on their living standards. It is this mass pressure that is forcing the pay strikes to continue. The strike planned for 14 October will be a significant step in the battle against austerity. In demonstrating in action their enormous potential power, the unions could draw behind them millions of, as yet, unorganised workers and all those suffering from these brutal cuts. The idea of a 24-hour general strike has been pushed back by the cowardly actions of the right-wing trade union leaders. But the need for it is widely understood, even if the confidence is not there at this time. The 14 October action has the potential to change this, bringing general strike action back to the forefront of workers' minds. This will open up the prospect of defeating this government and any government that acts in the interests of the 1%. Therefore, union members have to keep the pressure on. If your union hasn't confirmed for 14 October, move a motion at your next branch. Come to the lobby of the TUC Congress that the NSSN has called on 7 September. That will be a more than useful forum to discuss how to keep the action going and broaden and deepen the dispute. And inevitably, this campaign and the strikes themselves will pose the question of a political alternative. Just as they did on J10 and in 2011, workers striking in October will come up against the opposition of Labour politicians. They fear a mobilised trade union movement as much as the Con-Dems. The building of a mass political voice for working class people would hugely increase that fear. NSSN rally and lobby of the TUC Congress in Liverpool: 'Keep striking together for a pay rise' Speakers include Mark Serwotka, PCS general secretary 2pm, Sunday 7 September Jurys Hotel, opposite Echo Arena Conference Centre in Albert Dock See www.shopstewards.net for more - email info@shopstewards.ne t www.socialistparty.o rg.uk SocialistParty-SomersetBranch
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